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Category Archives: Literacy

Get in the room with LEGO® Model building these holidays … starting now

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Susan Boucher is an engineer, she’s passionate about robots and how things work and her new small business Young Engineers Brisbane North focuses on sharing those passions with tribes of 3-6 and 6-12 year-olds.

Susan’s STEM Edutainment workshops start next week in the Brisbane suburbs of Stafford, Herston and Wilston.

I’ve been helping Susan design her new business through my work with Greater Brisbane Small Business Advisory Services and she’s ready to roll.

You can get your daughter or son in the room with Susan for less than $20 for an hour and a half of exciting educational building fun with Lego Challenge and Big Builder sessions.

Call 0451 969 754 or email Susan personally at Brisbanenorth@young-engineers.com.au

Sessions start next Tuesday November 8:

Lego Challenge, 6-12yrs, Wilston State School, Grange, from 3.30-5pm for 5 weeks at $16.50 per week (introductory price, normally $18 per week).

Wednesday, November 9:

Big Builders, 3-6yrs, Stafford Community Centre from 9.30-10.30am for five weeks at $13.30 per week or 5 sessions for $50.

Saturday, December 10 and December 17:

Lego Challenge, 6-12yrs, ILP Learning Hub, Herston, from 9.30-11.00am at $19.80 per session.

Lego Challenge, 6-12yrs, ILP Learning Hub, Herston, from 2:00 – 3:30pm at $19.80 per session.

At the Brisbane State High School, South Brisbane, on:

December 12-14, $70 per day sessions from 9.00am-4:30pm.

During the school holidays, Susan will be running sessions at ILP Learning Hub, Herston, on:

December 16, 21 & 23 $66 for an all-day session 9.30am-4:00pm.

More sessions for January will be advertised in the coming weeks at www.BrisbaneNorth.young-engineers.com.au

If you are thinking about starting your own small business, I have sessions available for booking now, all during November and December to January 2017. Simply call 0413 004 138 or email edupreneurservices@gmail.com. Visit http://gbsbas.com.au/ to find out more and what’s available, fully funded by the Federal Government’s AusIndustry.

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Want to be a citizen journalist?

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Buy eBook or hardback here

Buy Kindle version here

Here’s a sample of Giulio Saggin’s new book we have published today:

Giulio Saggin began his career as a news photographer in 1989, at a time when newspapers had photographic departments with photographers, both staff and freelance.

In the ensuing years the media modernised but photographers always had their place.

The onset of the digital age changed all this and the media world is being transformed at what seems to be an exponential rate.

While there might be several million photographers around the world, there are several billion citizens with digital cameras and smart phones on hand to capture news as it happens.

This has resulted in an explosion in citizen photographers, where anyone can lay claim to being a photographer, and whose photos are largely free, or inexpensive, for media outlets to use.

Included in the several billion are journalists who, at the very least, have a mobile device with a camera. In an ever-expanding media market, the economics of one journalist with a camera has dictated they take on the role of photographer as part of their reporting duties.

The phenomenal rise in citizen journalism (photography) and journalists with cameras has had a detrimental effect on photographic departments and photographers around the world.

Many media outlets have chosen to do away with photographic staff and arm their journalists – many of whom side with the photographers – with cameras or smart phones and given them the task of taking ‘photos’ with minimal training at best.

As a result, the vast majority of images produced have been inferior to those produced by trained photographers (who study their art at college for at least 2-3 years, or the equivalent on-the-job training for older ‘pre-college’ photographers).

In most cases the journalists taking photos don’t have anyone to tell them right from wrong, so they have little or no idea if what they are doing is correct or otherwise. They have no way of learning. Photography is a discipline and a lack of discipline in any facet of life leads to chaos.

Visual stories are as complex as their written counterparts. Giving someone a camera/smart phone doesn’t make them a photographer, just as giving someone a laptop doesn’t make them a journalist.

It’s hard to say what the future will bring but it appears one thing is certain. If media outlets are going to want their journalists both to write and take photos, those with skills in both areas will be the ones getting the jobs.

While journalists are being made to take photos, photographers wanting to work in the media will have to learn to write.

The future may well see the traditional roles of journalists and photographers meld into the one term – photo-journalist.

It’s a term that has been in use for decades by those who already write and take photos, and many photographers because of their visual story-telling skills.

If the current trend is any guide, the term will become the ‘norm’ in the not-too-distant future.

Do you believe in success?

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Last Saturday we travelled 90 minutes south of Longreach to the little town of Stonehenge and cooked a few steaks and snags for the local Christmas Party on behalf of the Rotary Club. Desolate country at the moment but full of warm-hearted real Aussie people, kids and their parents. And out of this country has emerged our new hot Strictly Literary seller, Do You Believe in Dragons? by grazier Paul Currin. Paul and Julia Creek illustrator Maree Power have created a new world for young teens where horses, motorbikes, dogs, feral pigs and (well, there had to be …) dragons rule.

It’s a tale of fantasy based on the Currins’ real-life sheep property near Stonehenge. In the book, kids Ted and his younger brother Bill, along with their best friends Doug and Sarah, are on their school holidays enjoying everyday rural activities, including riding horses, motorbikes, going fishing and chasing feral pigs. Their holiday takes a strange turn when Sarah — the eldest, and only girl of the group — has an unlikely encounter with a magical dragon, which can’t be seen by anyone who doesn’t believe he is real. Excitement ensues, as one by one, the family members come to realise the existence of dragons. This awareness becomes increasingly important when a life-threatening situation unfolds involving the Ted and Bill’s father and a pack of dingoes.

Do You Believe in Dragons? is fine new Australian Outback fiction, professionally edited and produced at Strictly Literary and available for under $20 in paperback, or instantly for ePub, Kindle and for Android on Google Play. Perfect for the young jillaroo or jackaroo for Christmas!

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