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Category Archives: Books

We’re moving … please follow

Kent Lambert of Luscious Men’s Grooming Products

G’Day from Shopping Central … we’re expanding and moving our business from this blog to a new address which is called Shop Your Way to Success (TM)

Please bookmark our new page and look out for our weekly shopping blogs.

http://www.edupreneurservicesinternational.com/shop-your-way-to-success 

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Cats and Vintage

Close up of traditional polish christmas dish.

Close up of traditional Polish Christmas dish.

Dumplings are popular in Brisbane these days but Polish dumplings known as Pierogi (pronounced pyer-ro-gee) will be consumed at competitive speed next Sunday, June 26.

The 2nd Annual Pierogi Eating Competition will be at the Polish Club, 10 Marie Street, Milton, as part of the Milton Community Festival.

Pierogi are delicate white boiled dumplings with scalloped edges and filled with meat or cabbage or both and smothered in traditional onion relish.

Get in on the action!

How many can you knock off in a minute? Try out from 2pm on Sunday.

First one to finish 15 of these in one sitting wins the prize.

Brisbane Lord Mayor’s makers’ market with fashion market is on Saturday June 25.

Special fund raiser for the weekend is also at noon on Saturday June 25: a vintage fashion gold-coin auction in aid of local animal rescuers and the Cat Cuddle Café Red Hill.

Contact:

Polonia Polish Club

Henryk Kurylewski

0402 210 712 secretary@polonia.org.au

Want to be a citizen journalist?

You_TheCitizenPhotographer_cover

Buy eBook or hardback here

Buy Kindle version here

Here’s a sample of Giulio Saggin’s new book we have published today:

Giulio Saggin began his career as a news photographer in 1989, at a time when newspapers had photographic departments with photographers, both staff and freelance.

In the ensuing years the media modernised but photographers always had their place.

The onset of the digital age changed all this and the media world is being transformed at what seems to be an exponential rate.

While there might be several million photographers around the world, there are several billion citizens with digital cameras and smart phones on hand to capture news as it happens.

This has resulted in an explosion in citizen photographers, where anyone can lay claim to being a photographer, and whose photos are largely free, or inexpensive, for media outlets to use.

Included in the several billion are journalists who, at the very least, have a mobile device with a camera. In an ever-expanding media market, the economics of one journalist with a camera has dictated they take on the role of photographer as part of their reporting duties.

The phenomenal rise in citizen journalism (photography) and journalists with cameras has had a detrimental effect on photographic departments and photographers around the world.

Many media outlets have chosen to do away with photographic staff and arm their journalists – many of whom side with the photographers – with cameras or smart phones and given them the task of taking ‘photos’ with minimal training at best.

As a result, the vast majority of images produced have been inferior to those produced by trained photographers (who study their art at college for at least 2-3 years, or the equivalent on-the-job training for older ‘pre-college’ photographers).

In most cases the journalists taking photos don’t have anyone to tell them right from wrong, so they have little or no idea if what they are doing is correct or otherwise. They have no way of learning. Photography is a discipline and a lack of discipline in any facet of life leads to chaos.

Visual stories are as complex as their written counterparts. Giving someone a camera/smart phone doesn’t make them a photographer, just as giving someone a laptop doesn’t make them a journalist.

It’s hard to say what the future will bring but it appears one thing is certain. If media outlets are going to want their journalists both to write and take photos, those with skills in both areas will be the ones getting the jobs.

While journalists are being made to take photos, photographers wanting to work in the media will have to learn to write.

The future may well see the traditional roles of journalists and photographers meld into the one term – photo-journalist.

It’s a term that has been in use for decades by those who already write and take photos, and many photographers because of their visual story-telling skills.

If the current trend is any guide, the term will become the ‘norm’ in the not-too-distant future.

Beattie book available

Web cover BeattieThe new national vision from Queensland’s own Peter Beattie is available now exclusively through our Strictly Literary bookshop

Make sure you get your copy here first … in print or for Kindle and Android. In the meantime you can browse our extensive libraries and buy Peter Beattie’s first thriller novel The Year of the Dangerous Ones:

Print (Lulu) or Kindle (Amazon) or Android (Google Play)

 

Word is spreading

Online Journalism Blog

We’ve been invited to have our worldwide launch of Shopping News at the new Merino Markets at Longreach, so thanks Sue Smith for this honour. It’ll be in August and we’ll let you know details closer to the date. Copies will be on sale and you can also buy right here right now (click the book cover on the right –>).

UK journalism colleague Paul Bradshaw has also kindly devoted some of his popular blog space to a virtual launch and guest post about Shopping News … you’ll find loads of other interesting stories there too. Just click the image at the top of this post.

And we’ve announced the date for our first TAFE Small Business Solutions business improvement workshop, also in Longreach. We start at 5pm on August 11 and seats are strictly limited so please, if you want a booking, my advice is to get in now.

The story’s out

ShoppingNewsCover

After 10 years of research, my book Shopping News is now available from Melbourne publisher Australian Scholarly Publishing. Unlike most books about journalism it’s priced way below $100 … only $A39.95, and is available both as paperback and eBook. As the back-cover blurb says, “Shopping News contains the keys to the next generation of journalism and news publishing, with 16 clearly explained practical models for reporters, editors and producers everywhere”. I have shopped and researched for more than 10 years, from Iran and India to the UK, from China, France, South Africa and Australia to the United States. <more from the cover…> “As he shopped, Cokley learned retail and manufacturing secrets, including the latest in network theory, to show how journalists and publishers can reach and delight more people, ultimately achieving that Holy Grail of everyone in business, customer satisfaction, without compromising ethics or quality. It’s a must-read for everyone in the media business.”

Special excerpts and value-add illustrations from Shopping News will be published here from now on, including our new toolkit for reporters, editors, producers and Internet Service Providers, the Audience Soundtrack Analyser, and a Chinese version as well, priced at only 99 cents each. We hope you like Shopping News — and yes, it’s for shoppers, small business owners and digital marketing readers too

Need a mentor for your small business?

 

Very happy to let you know that our business experience and expertise is now available through the TAFE Queensland Small Business Solutions program, which offers business mentoring for a low one-off fee of $395. If you or a friend have a small business which could use the tried and tested advice and methods described here, please contact TAFE here and mention my name. Available all through Central and South-East Queensland. I have run businesses in publishing, retail, and (of course) small-to-medium sized journalism enterprises.

Cokley Mentor

A gift from a shopkeeper — free postage for your Christmas presents

Dallas Scott of the Garden Shed in Longreach tells us she is delighted to offer free postage within Australia for Christmas gifts ordered before December 10th. Here’s a look at her latest specials. Thanks Dallas!

Gingering up the bookshelves

Ginger, featuring art by Leonie Ryder

Ginger, featuring art by Leonie Ryder

Our friend and client Dr Leonie Ryder has just launched her major new book Ginger in Australian Food and Medicine through the Melbourne imprint Australian Scholarly Publishing ($39.95, paperback).

The book cover says it all: “This book traces the history of ginger, one of the oldest, most popular and versatile of spices, focusing on ginger growing and the use of ginger in Australian food and medicine from 1788 to the mid-20th century. The story is set in the context of ginger’s long history in China and India, ancient Greece and Rome, and Britain. Ginger was grown in the first garden in Sydney in 1788. As settlements were established further north, the spice thrived, and large quantities were also imported to meet ever-increasing demand. Including recipes and historical anecdotes with detail from specialist sources, Ginger in Australian Food and Medicine is for a wide readership.”

Strictly Literary is very proud to represent Dr Ryder. I met Leonie in 2010 when she was finishing work on the book and tracking down evidence that ginger was imported to Australia with the First Fleet in 1788.

She is one of those rare individuals to hold not one but two Doctorates — one in Aviation Psychology and one in Food History: that’s a major achievement! She is also an accomplished artist, as the sketches in this delightful volume demonstrate.

Brisbane shoppers can meet Leonie at Riverbend Books on Wednesday May 7 at 6pm (193 Oxford Street, Bulimba). More details here.

Cooks, historians and health fans will find much to love in Ginger, including recipes. You can order one here or in discerning bookshops.

Major new look at universities launched by Australian publisher

Uni COVER Feb 25

MELBOURNE, Australia: How have universities changed over the past 60 years? Are they any better now than they once were? And what will happen next? These are just some of the important issues that John Biggs encounters in reviewing his long academic career, a journey via Australia, the UK, Canada and Hong Kong. Tonight in one of our innovative social-media book events, Strictly Literary is proud to announce the worldwide launch of Changing Universities, John Biggs’ insightful and highly relevant memoir. It’s offered for sale as a print-on-demand paperback with a high-quality gloss cover in full colour and excellent professional binding (now printed in Australia to minimise time and delivery charges) and as an eBook in a range of formats for different reader platforms, including the popular Amazon Kindle.

J-Biggs-bcoverAs a student and as an academic, John Biggs (left) has participated in 60 years of change in universities, changes in time and in place. He graduated in psychology from the University of Tasmania in 1957 and obtained his PhD from Birkbeck College, University of London. He has held academic positions in the University of New England, Monash University, the University of Alberta, Newcastle University NSW, and the University of Hong Kong, holding full professorships in the last three. He has published extensively on learning and teaching in institutional settings. His concept of constructive alignment, described in Teaching for Quality Learning at University, has been implemented in several countries. Since retiring, he and his wife Catherine Tang have consulted on learning and teaching in higher education in several countries. Also since retirement he has published four novels (including Disguises, also now available from Strictly Literary), a collection of short stories, and a social-political history of his home state, Tasmania.

Biggs’ experiences were bizarre, traumatic, hilarious but in the end rewarding. His experiences tell us what universities were once like, how they came to be what they are today, with a hopeful stab at what they might be like in future.

Eminent academics have reviewed Changing Universities and here’s what they have had to say:

Prof John Kirby, of Queen’s University, Canada says: “Biggs is a true scholar, happiest when left to his research and teaching.”

John Hattie, Professor and Director, Melbourne Education Research Institute, University of Melbourne, writes: “There have been many books about the major changes to universities – usually decrying the managerialism, pursuit of funding, and lack of collegiality. John Biggs tells the story of change via a remarkable career – across four continents, many universities, and different cultures. The intrigue, the power users and abusers, the games, and the spineless nature of too many within these universities seem not to have changed over the last 50 years. More fun to read than the current attacks on universities, it still raises serious questions about how universities are run, for what reason, and for what benefits. This is a perfect read not only for current academics, especially those thinking of moving to Head positions, but also for outsiders who wonder what happens in the ivory towers.”

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